5 Insider Secrets for Giving Yourself Shooting Freedom

Have you given yourself a reality check lately? At one point in my career, I felt like my business was running me instead of the other way around. I felt like my photos were beautiful, but nothing special. I wanted to take photos for clients in the way I documented my family life, but wasn’t. Give yourself a reality check

and read this Letter to Photographers: Have you taken yourself hostage? And then, enjoy these 5 tips!

 

shooting freedom

 

5 tips for giving yourself shooting freedom:

1. Explore your taste while you learn. Study the why behind the photos you love (and don’t love).

Here’s a brilliant thought: maybe you aren’t meant to take on clients in the sense of families, couples, etc., that is ever popular part of the industry. Maybe you were put into the world to travel and tell stories through your photos. Maybe you were meant to create delicious, food photos for magazines. Maybe it is in your blood to create visual pieces of conceptual fine art and own a gallery one day. Explore all of the corners of the industry before jumping on the trendy train. If you’re anything like me, you’ll start down one path and inevitably change your course, and that’s okay too. You live and you learn and it’s what makes exploring fun.

 

2. We owe it to ourselves to let our inner artist be the seed of our business. Income should never be the seed, but part of the growth along the way.

Enough said

Learn-Documentary-Photography

3. No ebook, mentoring session, workshop, online course, or product will make you a better photographer.

YOU make you a better photographer when you rock your camera like an athlete making the decision to do better every single day. The coaching and the tips are guidance and certainly valuable, but no product out there is going to hold a magic formula to whatever you’re looking for. That formula doesn’t exist.

 

4. Host a date night for dreaming.

Do this with yourself first, but don’t be afraid to invite other photographer friends over. Lift each other to success. Spend time understanding the photos that give you fulfillment. Base your goals and business plan around that very passion. Mistakes will be made along the way, but taking time to reset is crucial to avoid getting deep into a business you aren’t happy in. Thank about where you want this journey to take you regularly.

 

5. Give yourself permission to take a step back.

The Marie I am today has lost care for the number of sessions on my calendar. Let me tell you, I have bills too. I learned that as much as I love shooting, it’s not worth it for my business or sanity for me to do “filler sessions” (ones that don’t represent me as an artist, but rake in a little dough just to pay my bills). It may be making a credit card payment, it it’s using up my shutter clicks. At the end of the day, are your clients going to pay your next camera bill? Nope. Especially if you haven’t set your business up for pricing that will grow your business, then you may as well not take on the sessions. And, definitely not the ones you don’t want anyway! Save those shutter actuations for heartfelt clicks. Don’t give them away so freely.

 

Have these tips helped you? Great! Help your photographer friends by sharing this post on your fave social media site. Comment below if you have any tips that I may have missed – let’s encourage each other to be the photographers we strive to be.

Need more inspiration? Get lost in these posts:

Introducing a New Session to Clients: Documentary Style Sessions

Documenting Reality: Nightlife of a Parent

Session Sparks blog series – Real Photo Session Ideas

Session Pricing, Traveling, and Client Vision

Author: MarieMasse

I help client documentary photographers fine-tune their workflow + marketing game, so their work is filled with sessions that represent their voice + client values while earning a living. I shoot undirected, off-beat stories that aren’t preserved often enough (like the story of couples before starting a fam or becoming empty-nesters – a dream project of mine), so my clients’ old box of photos is a meaningful, visual diary of their life + legacy to leave behind.


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